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Posts Tagged ‘diet’

Hoof Health and Soundness in the Horse: Personal Observations

“No Foot, No Horse”.  This is a common saying throughout the years that has stood the test of time and has remained truthful in many regards.  The fact is that the horse is highly dependent upon their feet and thus, the external hoof capsule, for overall soundness and quality of life.  The concept of hoof…

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Equine Arthritis and Bone Deterioration; Is It Reversible?

Equine arthritis and bone degenerative changes are all too common in the horse industry.  These changes can impact any joint, but commonly found in the fetlock, carpus or knee, hock or tarsus, stifle, hip and back region.  The navicular bone and coffin bone are also commonly impacted and associated with navicular disease and pedal osteitis. …

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Managing Insulin and Leptin Resistance in the Horse

Insulin and leptin resistance are very common in the horse suffering from equine metabolic syndrome.  Although the increase in levels of these two hormones is due to inflammatory changes on a cellular level, the rise in levels can contribute to various health problems in the horse.  Many horse owners that own horses with insulin or…

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Equine Digestion, Gut Health, and Impact on Disease

Digestion.  It is a simple, yet, very complex process in the horse that is often overlooked by owners and veterinarians.  We often see it as just being a matter of putting food into the mouth, then the stomach, and all will be well in the end.  Although that concept is rather simple, the process is…

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What Do I Feed My Dog?

Your dog is dependent on you to feed them correctly, but there are many choices out there and no dog is the same inside or out.  A dog can be viewed as a beloved family companion, can be a working animal, or could be an outdoor pet.  Despite the different levels, each dog has their…

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Management Options for Ear Infections in Dogs

Ear infections are a common problem in the dog, but can vary in severity and rate of occurrence dependent on the breed.  In many cases, it seems like the condition appears 2-3 times per year, if not more often.  The more often the ear infection condition arises in your dog, not only does this signal…

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Recurrent Ear Infections in the Dog and Causes

If you own a dog, chances are in their lifetime you will contend with at least one ear infection.  For some, that one infection may happen in the lifetime of their pet, or it could occur more often, potentially every month or two.  Ear infections happen, as they are a part of life for some…

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Tendon and Ligament Injuries in the Horse and Recovery

Tendon injuries are all too common in the horse and are not just confined to the equine athlete.  Any horse can succumb to a strained tendon, even on pasture, with a wrong step or muddy footing.  Despite the injuries being common, the recovery process can be quite extensive for many, resulting on a significant time…

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PSSM in Horses; Thoughts and Considerations on Therapy Options

Polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) is an increasing diagnosis in the equine community and is linked back to a group of conditions, referred to as ‘myopathies’.  The problem of PSSM is becoming more commonplace, leaving many owners unsure as to what the condition is or how to best manage it. Like many other conditions, PSSM is…

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Taking the Thoroughbred Race Horse to the Next Level

The Thoroughbred race horse and the racing industry as a whole has been an area of keen interest to me, dating back to my days in veterinary college.  As students, we would see these unique patients on a daily basis and assist in therapy.  I would also spend much of my off-time, at the local race tracks in Ohio, in the backstretch, to get a different view point and learn as much as I could.  Given my current location, we do not have TB racing in our state, but yet, I still work with them on an almost daily basis through rehabilitation and consultations, with a quick trip here and there to tracks outside of my state. Through our research and consultations, along with reading as much as I can my hands on, I begin to make connections to what we are doing now, as compared to 20-30+ years ago.  Could these differences or changes be creating the rise in lameness, poor performance and EIPH (bleeders)?  If so, could management of these factors help us to reduce those problems and maybe enhance performance on a whole new level?

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